This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Telehealth Without a “Double Flush” by Jim Eischen of Eischen Law Group

So what is “telehealth?” California’s new telehealth law (AB 415) redefines it as:

“The mode of delivering health care services and public health via information and communication technologies to facilitate the diagnosis, consultation, treatment, education, care management, and self-management of a patient’s health care while the patient is at the originating site and the health care provider is at a distant site.  Telehealth facilitates patient self-management and caregiver support for patients and includes synchronous interactions and asynchronous store and forward transfers.”

California’s new telehealth laws includes email and telephone communication. Both real-time (“synchronous”) and time-delayed (“asynchronous”) electronic communication are also included. Email or telephone telehealth is not a mandatory plan reimbursement, but plan reimbursement is now more possible. Verbal consent now adequately authorizes California telehealth services. Prior Medi-Cal restrictions on implementing telehealth (ex. establishing a barrier to face-to-face visits before telehealth authorized) were removed.

Is something new afoot? Yes and no. Telehealth is not a new idea. In 1996 California was the first state in the US to pass legislation (the Telemedicine Development Act of 1996) establishing telemedicine as a legitimate method of delivering health care (but with limited reimbursement provisions). The Department of Health & Human Services/Medicare has experimented with telemedicine projects to deliver medical services to underserved/rural areas lacking sufficient medical infrastructure. But, like California, Medicare does not broadly reimburse for telephone or email or other telehealth services.

Telehealth is not new. But there is a renewed and historic effort by governments to reduce medical entitlement costs and achieve improved primary care outcomes so we slow down plan (i.e. Medicare) utilization. Why? Because if we don’t get healthier more efficiently, Medicare goes broke funding too much hospitalization and expensive medical intervention. The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) is trying very hard to generate innovative methods to more efficiently delivery primary care: incentivized electronic medical records platforms to improve physician/patient communication and information management; accountable care organizations intended to compensate hospital/physician teams for decreasing hospitalization while better tracking patient information; and telehealth certainly fits right in with this effort. Makes sense. But does it also make “cents”–are we feasibly solving the underlying primary problem? […]

By |October 31st, 2011|Physician Help|Comments Off on Telehealth Without a “Double Flush” by Jim Eischen of Eischen Law Group

Letter From The Editor

By Michael C. Tetreault, Editor-In-Chief

http://www.conciergemedicinetoday.com/

Top 10 Most Searched Places For Concierge Medical Care In U.S.

By Michael Tetreault | Editor-In-Chief | Concierge Medicine Today

OCTOBER 19, 2011 – While concierge medicine may have a bit of a public
relations problem in the media, families with 2 or more children and
individuals from age 25 to 85 who are either […]

By |October 24th, 2011|News|Comments Off on Letter From The Editor

Caffeine Helps Reduce Depression

Wait until you hear about this great drug. It reduces the rate of depression, lowers your risk for having a heart attack and even reduces your chances of developing high blood pressure. It’s called “1,3,7-Trimethylxanthine,” but don’t ask your doctor for a prescription, and forget about going to your corner drug dealer.

You see, it’s already […]

By |October 17th, 2011|News|Comments Off on Caffeine Helps Reduce Depression

American Academy of Private Physicians Expands Member Benefits to Offer Practice Website Solution from Officite

Officite partners with the American Academy of Private Physicians to provide professional practice websites and Internet marketing services to its membership.

Downers Grove, Il— Officite, the number one provider of medical websites and Internet marketing, has been endorsed by the American Academy of Private Physicians (AAPP) as the Academy’s first and only practice website and online marketing provider. As the newest member benefit, Officite will provide the AAPP’s growing membership with special pricing on customizable websites and turnkey Internet marketing solutions for attracting, educating and better communicating with new and existing patients online.

The AAPP represents a growing number of physicians who provide “concierge medicine,” fee-for-service, and other forms of health care delivery characterized by a direct, financial relationship between private physicians and their patients. This movement is changing the American health care by restoring the doctor-patient relationship of times past.  Membership in AAPP provides valuable, cost-effective resources to help doctors become a concierge physician, insights into the business of concierge medicine, and avenues to connect with other concierge doctors as well as generate patients looking for concierge physicians in their “Find A Physician” search. […]

By |October 7th, 2011|AAPP Members|Comments Off on American Academy of Private Physicians Expands Member Benefits to Offer Practice Website Solution from Officite

What will ObamaCare do to seniors? by Tom LaGrelius

On Wednesday August 24, 2011 I was invited to make a presentation to the Peninsula Seniors Organization at the Hess Park Auditorium in Palos Verdes, CA.  The subject was “How the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) Will Affect Seniors on Medicare”.  There is a lot of interest.  It was standing room only and crowd spilled out into the hallway.

Preparation for that talk involved a lot of study in the weeks prior.  I knew the law was gravely flawed.  I had served on the Los Angeles County Medical Association’s Sub Committee charged with reviewing all the “reform” bills before they became law.  Since then many regulations have been written and a clearer picture has emerged of how the law will affect current and future Medicare enrollees.  Speaker Pelosi, now out of a job, said we had to pass the law to know what was in it.  Now we know.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) is not about helping seniors.  It is about providing new health insurance for 50 million uninsured younger Americans and preventive medicine coverage for 100 million currently uncovered younger people.  Funding comes partly from new taxes, but mostly by stripping over a half a trillion dollars from Medicare members.  Five hundred and twenty-three billion dollars was taken away from Medicare to help fund the rest.  That’s over $11,000 per current Medicare enrollee over the next ten years.

Some benefits were added to Medicare such as paying a small amount for annual checkups, eliminating deductibles and co pays on a few things like colonoscopies and mammograms and closing the donut hole in Medicare Part D in 2019.  That’s about it for benefits.  There were ten dollars in cuts for every dollar in new Medicare benefits.

The law creates no new doctors or nurses.  In fact it cuts funding for some training programs.  But it does add a hundred million people looking to collect on their mandated new prepaid annual checkups and preventive care benefits.  Unlike Medicare patients, most of these people are well.  This is a huge supply problem.  No one knows where the doctors and nurses to deliver on this demand will come from.  […]

By |October 7th, 2011|News|Comments Off on What will ObamaCare do to seniors? by Tom LaGrelius

AAOSH in Boston by Daniel Bobrow

The last weekend in September found me in at Boston’s Renaissance Waterfront Hotel for the AAPP’s Annual Summit on Concierge Medicine.  While the weather may have been inconsistent, the caliber of presenters was anything but.

I was invited to attend by virtue of my position as Founding Board Member of the American Academy for Oral Systemic Health (AAOSH), whose Mission, as the website states, is “…to improve inter-disciplinary healthcare and collaboration, and the health of people everywhere by changing public and professional awareness of the mouth-body health links.”

This means gaining a deeper appreciation for and ability to practice what I term the Three Cs:

Clinical – mastery of the skills to detect markers for systemic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, pregnancy complications, etc. and either treat or refer patients as appropriate to physicians for further testing and treatment
Collaborative – development, cultivation and nurture of a comprehensive network of healthcare providers

and

Communication – the necessary skill set and resources to educate and persuade current and prospective patients to value and ‘say yes’ to proposed treatment

In early 2011, AAPP and AAOSH entered into a ‘friendly partnership arrangement’ to foster just this kind of collaboration among healthcare providers.  The fact that nearly 15% of attendees at the Summit were dentists suggests the partnership is off to a very good start indeed. […]

By |October 7th, 2011|AAPP Events|Comments Off on AAOSH in Boston by Daniel Bobrow